Using a Fire Extinguisher

Posted by on Apr 23, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Using a Fire Extinguisher let’s hope you never have to use a fire extinguisher. Fires are very dangerous and can grow out of control quickly. However, if a fire has started in the building you occupy, using a fire extinguisher may be necessary and the more you know about the proper use the better chance you have of fighting back the flames long enough to get everyone out of the building safely. The first step is to read the instructions on your fire extinguisher. You don’t want to wait for a blaze to start and be caught reading the label. Most fire extinguishers operate in a similar manner so once you learn how to operate one you can easily figure out how to use other models. It is also a good idea to become familiar with the parts of the fire extinguisher. Have a check-down list of employees who will be trained on using the fire extinguisher and have more than two since some people may be out sick on the day the fire occurs. A simple way to remember how to use a fire extinguisher is to learn the acronym P.A.S.S. This stands for Pull the pin, Aim at the base of the fire, Squeeze the level slowly and Sweep from side to side. The top of the fire extinguisher will have a pin release locking mechanism. Pulling this pin unlocks the device and will allow you to discharge the extinguisher. Some people panic and start spraying at the height of the fire. This is a bad since that is not where the fire is originating. Locate the where the fire is being fueled from and aim the extinguisher at the base of the fire. If you extinguish the source the flames will die out fast. Always squeeze the level slowly. Again, panic can set in and if you press the level too hard and fast you could easily use up the extinguisher in seconds. Be careful to check that the fire hasn’t caught on curtains or walls and if it has make a sweeping motion to extinguish these flames before it rises to the ceiling. The recommended method for putting out a fire with an extinguisher is to use a sweeping motion from side to side. Be sure you are at a safe distance and slowly move forward as the fire begins to fade. Once the fire is out do not leave the scene. Many times embers will be slowly burning and if you turn your back the fire can easily reignite. Stand by for a few minutes and spray again to ensure the fire is out completely. After the fire is out make plans to have the fire extinguisher recharged and inspected. Call Abco Fire to assist you with all your fire extinguisher concerns or Contact Us We can help. Providing Fire Extinguisher Inspection and Recharge Service in the Tampa Bay...

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Top Causes Of Fires In The Home

Posted by on Mar 7, 2017 in Blog | Comments Off on Top Causes Of Fires In The Home

Top Causes Of Fires In The Home

Fires in the home are some of the most devastating and yet are one of the most easily avoided types that we can all learn about. Knowing where and in what situations fires are likely to happen in the home can help keep you and your neighborhood safe. Common Causes of Fire in Homes Some of the most common causes of fires in the home include:  Cooking Fires: Cooking fires are very dangerous because they often involve grease which can easily spread. If a grease fire starts DO NOT pour water on it. Instead turn off the heat immediately then throw some baking soda on it or smother it with a pot cover. DO NOT try to pat it out with a dish towel or anything that is itself flammable.  Smoking: If you smoke at home, then yes; this can happen to you. Preferably you should smoke only outside but if weather is not permitting or you have another reason to smoke inside, be sure to use a proper cigarette container for ashes and do not leave a lit cigarette unattended. Candles: Candles can create a romantic ambiance; they can also create a fire. NEVER leave a candle unattended whether you are leaving the house for a minute or for a late night. Extinguish all candles before leaving the house and keep them away from other flammable materials. Flammable Liquids: Fuel, cleaning agents, thinners, paints and other raw materials which are flammable requires special attention when kept at home. They can catch fire if they are stored improperly or near direct flame. Unfortunately mostly people do not pay attention to this fact and store them anywhere they wish to; which could result in explosions, fires, and severe damage.  Fireworks: In many parts of the country fireworks are illegal at home. But if your area allows them you need to be extra careful in using them. NEVER use them in the home or near dry brush areas outside. How To Avoid Fires In The Home Caution and attention should be all you need to ensure that a fire is avoided in your home. Too often simple carelessness leads from a fun to harmful situation and by simply taking a few easy precautions like those below will help you and your family stay safe. In the Kitchen: Never leave a burner unattended. Try cooking at recommended and safe temperatures. Don’t wear lose clothing while cooking, they can catch fire easily. Also avoid wearing fabrics which are easily enflamed. Keep matches and lighters in a cabinet. Don’t keep it open and in reach of children. Keep flammable items away from the stove. Ensure that your electrical cooking appliances are safe. Smokers: Smokers should try using “fire safe cigarettes”. Smoking outdoors is sensible and quite reasonable. Always use an ashtray (should be large and deep). Candles: Never leave your room or house with any burning candles. Always keep them on hard surfaces or a material that is immune to fire. Keep them away from plastic or flammable items. Using candle holders is the best way to avoid...

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Pinellas County CO2 Kegerator Refill

Posted by on Jan 25, 2017 in Blog, Featured | Comments Off on Pinellas County CO2 Kegerator Refill

Pinellas County CO2 Kegerator Refill

Pinellas County CO2 Kegerator Refill   There are many uses for CO2 other than just fire extinguishers in today’s world, and ABCO Fire & Safety, Inc offers convenient, same day servicefor these different needs. Whether you own a restaurant and use CO2 for soft drinks, or you are a home brewer, ABCO Fire can fill or hydro-test your tanks. We also sell new and used tanks. Make sure you are ready for your next big event, whether it be a big race, the big football game, or a weekend home brewing event, let ABCO Fire & Safety Inc keep your CO2 tanks full. Come to our office in Pinellas Park for your CO2 needs! Restaurants Home Brewing Auto Racers Paint Balling...

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The Type of Fire Extinguisher Every Home Should Have

Posted by on Dec 18, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on The Type of Fire Extinguisher Every Home Should Have

Extinguish Your Worries Over Picking the Right Fire Extinguisher A fire is a fire, and a fire extinguisher is a fire extinguisher, right? Well, not quite. There are actually different types of fires and different types of extinguishers that respond best to each. So, which is right for you? We’ll get to that, but first let’s look at the five different fire types, as outlined by the Fire Equipment Manufacturers’ Association: Class A: Fires in ordinary combustibles, such as wood, paper, cloth, etc. Class B: Fires in flammable liquids, like gasoline, or flammable gasses, such as propane. Class C: Fires in energized electrical equipment, such as appliances or motors. Class D: Fires in combustible metals. Class K: Fires in cooking oils and greases, such as animal and vegetable fats. Selecting a Fire Extinguisher For each fire class, there’s a fire extinguisher to match, and it’s important to use the right one. For example, an extinguisher rated for Class B fires only might not be appropriate to use on another fire. In fact, it might even be dangerous. So, how do you pick a fire extinguisher? Do you need several? A good bet is a multipurpose extinguisher, which typically is rated for Class A, B and C fires and available at home improvement stores. This type of extinguisher is typically good for general living areas and will work on small grease fires, as well. Specialized kitchen extinguishers are available, too. (Note: Class K extinguishers are typically for large commercial kitchens.) No matter which type you choose, you want: An extinguisher that’s large enough to put out a small fire but not too heavy to handle safely. One that carries the label of an independent testing laboratory. One for each level of your home, as well as in the garage. Using a Fire Extinguisher Before you use a fire extinguisher — or try to fight a fire with any method — make sure you consider the following questions: Is the fire small and contained? Are you safe from toxic smoke? Do you have a way to escape? Do your instincts tell you it’s OK? If you’ve answered “yes” to those questions, the National Fire Protection Association recommends remembering “P.A.S.S.” when it’s time to use your extinguisher: Pull the pin. Aim the nozzle or hose at the base of the fire. Squeeze the lever. Sweep the hose from side to side. Once the fire is out, remain aware, because it can re-ignite. Maintaining a Fire Extinguisher It’s easy to just put an extinguisher in your kitchen cabinet and forget about it. But, by doing that, you run the risk of it not working when you need it most. According to the U.S. Fire Administration, some need to be shaken monthly, and others need to be pressure tested periodically. Follow the instructions on your specific extinguisher. Also, check regularly to make sure it’s not damaged, rusted or dirty. Remember, a fire extinguisher won’t do you any good if it doesn’t work, and it won’t help if you can’t get to it, either. So, ensure it’s in an accessible place, not buried in the back of a closet. Finally, don’t ever forget that sometimes your best bet is not using an extinguisher at all. It’s using your family escape plan to get you and your loved ones out of danger. If there’s any doubt, get out!...

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How to Select the Right Portable Fire Extinguisher

Posted by on Sep 30, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on How to Select the Right Portable Fire Extinguisher

When thinking about how to select the right fire extinguisher in Tampa Bay, ask, “What type of fire is burning?” It is extremely important to have the proper fire extinguisher for the type of fire that is burning. Many people assume that a fire extinguisher will put out any type of fire and this is not the case. Specific types of fires require a specific type of fire extinguisher. Some fire extinguishers will leave a powder mess behind and damage sensitive equipment, while other fire extinguishers will leave hardly a trace and not damage sensitive equipment such as computers. In order to help you select the right fire extinguisher, this article will explore the different types of fires and the correct type of fire extinguisher to use. Fires are categorized in different types of classes, Class A, B, C, D and K. The class is determined by the materials involved in the fire. A class A fire involves common combustibles, such as wood or paper. Class B fires involves flammable liquids such as gas or oil. Class C fires involve energized electricity such as a fire involving a surge protector. Class D fires involve combustible metal fires, such as aluminum. Class K fires involve cooking oils and are generally found in restaurant kitchens. So in order to determine the type of fire extinguisher you need you need to access the situation and the surroundings you will place the extinguisher. Generally for home or office use an ABC fire extinguisher will cover all the bases, it would cover combustibles, flammable liquids and electrical type of fires. A big cooking space that has a lot of frying oil in a deep fryer would require a K-Class fire extinguisher as well as fire suppression system. A Halotron fire extinguisher leaves no residue and is a good choice when sensitive equipment is involved. The first thing to do in assessing the type of fire extinguisher needed is determine the type of fire that could occur. A building fire assessment from a qualified technician could help facilitate this process. A technician could determine the type, size and weight of the fire extinguisher needed. A qualified technician or local fire authority could also help in the correct placement of the fire extinguisher and the correct number of fire extinguishers that would be needed to meet building standards and codes. Portable fire extinguishers are what the name implies, they are easily carried, or portable. They help you get to the source of the fire and help extinguish it. They are meant for small fires that if not extinguished, could turn into large, uncontrolled fires. If the fire is not extinguished with the fire extinguisher call your local fire department or 911. Placement is also important. Portable fire extinguishers should be placed in a very visible location that has an unobstructed view, placed along normal travel paths and the extinguisher instructions facing outward so if an untrained person is using the fire extinguisher, they can easily see how to operate the extinguisher. Fire extinguishers should also be placed within easy reach, and placed in corridors or aisles that lead to an exit, never be blocked by equipment or stacked boxes, and be placed by potential fire hazards. Place the fire extinguisher so it will not potentially be cut off from a fire, or be damaged by equipment, such as a fork lift. Place it where they will be protected from the elements. A fire extinguisher cabinet could help facilitate this. The placement of signage indicating the fire extinguisher in red helps letting clients, customers, and employees know...

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How To Prepare For Common Restaurant Kitchen Fire Hazards

Posted by on Jun 9, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on How To Prepare For Common Restaurant Kitchen Fire Hazards

How To Prepare For Common Restaurant Kitchen Fire Hazards Whether you operate a quick-service chophouse or a five-star bistro, your restaurant kitchen is a hotbed of flammable materials and high-powered cooking methods. If you want to avoid disaster, it’s important to remember that your fire safety standards are just as unique and important as the food you serve and the number of customers you attract. Despite modern safety innovations and strict health and safety standards, disaster does strike thousands of kitchens every year. According to the U.S. Fire Administration, American fire departments respond to about 5,600 restaurant fires each year. These fires cost an estimated $116 million in property damage alone annually, in addition to 100 injuries and even a few deaths. Is your kitchen prepared to minimize the risks associated with your cooking methods, materials, and equipment? Fire hazards are common in most restaurant kitchens, but you can decrease your odds of disaster if you understand the specific safety precautions that each hazard requires. Faulty Electrical Wiring If you work in the restaurant industry, you’re already familiar with the importance of keeping your kitchen up-to-code. Local safety requirements and industry-wide safety standards don’t exist simply to prevent your customers from getting sick; they also apply to your power sources. Old, faulty, and exposed electrical wiring is a disaster waiting to happen, as are old kitchen appliances and breaker boxes. To avoid an electrical fire, pay close attention to the maintenance requirements outlined by the Occupational Health and Safety Act. Your specific equipment, kitchen size, and other details will affect the maintenance standards you must follow. And even if you have a well-maintained electrical system, you must also make sure flammable materials don’t come into contact with wall outlets. Clogged Hood Filters Restaurant exhaust hoods are designed to eliminate excess grease, gases, smoke, and odors from your kitchen. They play a crucial role in keeping your restaurant safe and up-to-code, but they depend on a working and well-maintained filtration system to do the job properly. When grease accumulates on hood filters, it makes them less efficient, but it also creates a new fire hazard right above your cooking surfaces. Know how to clean your exhaust hood properly, and make sure you and your staff prioritize this process. Follow both manufacturer recommendations and OHSA safety regulations. In case of quick buildup or human error, make sure you also have a Class K Kitchen Fire Extinguisher exactly 20 feet from all stovetops. Oily Rags and Towels Your kitchen staff may use rags to wipe grease, oil, and other flammable substances off your kitchen surfaces throughout the day. It’s important to prevent these liquids from building up and creating fire hazards, but the rags themselves become fire hazards too. Don’t let highly combustible materials accumulate in your kitchen. According to the National Fire Protection agency, grease accumulation actually causes 21 percent of all restaurant fires. Spontaneous combustion is a very real risk when large amounts of grease are concentrated in one place, so make sure no one leaves oily rags or towels lying around. After a rag is used to wipe down grease, it should be contained in a non-flammable trash or laundry bin, preferably outside the kitchen area. Burning Solid Fuels Any fuels that produce excess heat or smoke will also require extra safety precautions. If you cook with solid fuel such as charcoal, briquettes, hardwood, or mesquite, you must have a working and well-maintained filtration system that prevents smoke and carbon monoxide buildup. You must also make sure it properly eliminates the flammable debris left behind. If flying debris from...

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