Pinellas County CO2 Kegerator Refill

Posted by on Jan 25, 2017 in Blog, Featured | Comments Off on Pinellas County CO2 Kegerator Refill

Pinellas County CO2 Kegerator Refill

Pinellas County CO2 Kegerator Refill   There are many uses for CO2 other than just fire extinguishers in today’s world, and ABCO Fire & Safety, Inc offers convenient, same day servicefor these different needs. Whether you own a restaurant and use CO2 for soft drinks, or you are a home brewer, ABCO Fire can fill or hydro-test your tanks. We also sell new and used tanks. Make sure you are ready for your next big event, whether it be a big race, the big football game, or a weekend home brewing event, let ABCO Fire & Safety Inc keep your CO2 tanks full. Come to our office in Pinellas Park for your CO2 needs! Restaurants Home Brewing Auto Racers Paint Balling...

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The Type of Fire Extinguisher Every Home Should Have

Posted by on Dec 18, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on The Type of Fire Extinguisher Every Home Should Have

Extinguish Your Worries Over Picking the Right Fire Extinguisher A fire is a fire, and a fire extinguisher is a fire extinguisher, right? Well, not quite. There are actually different types of fires and different types of extinguishers that respond best to each. So, which is right for you? We’ll get to that, but first let’s look at the five different fire types, as outlined by the Fire Equipment Manufacturers’ Association: Class A: Fires in ordinary combustibles, such as wood, paper, cloth, etc. Class B: Fires in flammable liquids, like gasoline, or flammable gasses, such as propane. Class C: Fires in energized electrical equipment, such as appliances or motors. Class D: Fires in combustible metals. Class K: Fires in cooking oils and greases, such as animal and vegetable fats. Selecting a Fire Extinguisher For each fire class, there’s a fire extinguisher to match, and it’s important to use the right one. For example, an extinguisher rated for Class B fires only might not be appropriate to use on another fire. In fact, it might even be dangerous. So, how do you pick a fire extinguisher? Do you need several? A good bet is a multipurpose extinguisher, which typically is rated for Class A, B and C fires and available at home improvement stores. This type of extinguisher is typically good for general living areas and will work on small grease fires, as well. Specialized kitchen extinguishers are available, too. (Note: Class K extinguishers are typically for large commercial kitchens.) No matter which type you choose, you want: An extinguisher that’s large enough to put out a small fire but not too heavy to handle safely. One that carries the label of an independent testing laboratory. One for each level of your home, as well as in the garage. Using a Fire Extinguisher Before you use a fire extinguisher — or try to fight a fire with any method — make sure you consider the following questions: Is the fire small and contained? Are you safe from toxic smoke? Do you have a way to escape? Do your instincts tell you it’s OK? If you’ve answered “yes” to those questions, the National Fire Protection Association recommends remembering “P.A.S.S.” when it’s time to use your extinguisher: Pull the pin. Aim the nozzle or hose at the base of the fire. Squeeze the lever. Sweep the hose from side to side. Once the fire is out, remain aware, because it can re-ignite. Maintaining a Fire Extinguisher It’s easy to just put an extinguisher in your kitchen cabinet and forget about it. But, by doing that, you run the risk of it not working when you need it most. According to the U.S. Fire Administration, some need to be shaken monthly, and others need to be pressure tested periodically. Follow the instructions on your specific extinguisher. Also, check regularly to make sure it’s not damaged, rusted or dirty. Remember, a fire extinguisher won’t do you any good if it doesn’t work, and it won’t help if you can’t get to it, either. So, ensure it’s in an accessible place, not buried in the back of a closet. Finally, don’t ever forget that sometimes your best bet is not using an extinguisher at all. It’s using your family escape plan to get you and your loved ones out of danger. If there’s any doubt, get out!...

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How to Select the Right Portable Fire Extinguisher

Posted by on Sep 30, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on How to Select the Right Portable Fire Extinguisher

When thinking about how to select the right fire extinguisher in Tampa Bay, ask, “What type of fire is burning?” It is extremely important to have the proper fire extinguisher for the type of fire that is burning. Many people assume that a fire extinguisher will put out any type of fire and this is not the case. Specific types of fires require a specific type of fire extinguisher. Some fire extinguishers will leave a powder mess behind and damage sensitive equipment, while other fire extinguishers will leave hardly a trace and not damage sensitive equipment such as computers. In order to help you select the right fire extinguisher, this article will explore the different types of fires and the correct type of fire extinguisher to use. Fires are categorized in different types of classes, Class A, B, C, D and K. The class is determined by the materials involved in the fire. A class A fire involves common combustibles, such as wood or paper. Class B fires involves flammable liquids such as gas or oil. Class C fires involve energized electricity such as a fire involving a surge protector. Class D fires involve combustible metal fires, such as aluminum. Class K fires involve cooking oils and are generally found in restaurant kitchens. So in order to determine the type of fire extinguisher you need you need to access the situation and the surroundings you will place the extinguisher. Generally for home or office use an ABC fire extinguisher will cover all the bases, it would cover combustibles, flammable liquids and electrical type of fires. A big cooking space that has a lot of frying oil in a deep fryer would require a K-Class fire extinguisher as well as fire suppression system. A Halotron fire extinguisher leaves no residue and is a good choice when sensitive equipment is involved. The first thing to do in assessing the type of fire extinguisher needed is determine the type of fire that could occur. A building fire assessment from a qualified technician could help facilitate this process. A technician could determine the type, size and weight of the fire extinguisher needed. A qualified technician or local fire authority could also help in the correct placement of the fire extinguisher and the correct number of fire extinguishers that would be needed to meet building standards and codes. Portable fire extinguishers are what the name implies, they are easily carried, or portable. They help you get to the source of the fire and help extinguish it. They are meant for small fires that if not extinguished, could turn into large, uncontrolled fires. If the fire is not extinguished with the fire extinguisher call your local fire department or 911. Placement is also important. Portable fire extinguishers should be placed in a very visible location that has an unobstructed view, placed along normal travel paths and the extinguisher instructions facing outward so if an untrained person is using the fire extinguisher, they can easily see how to operate the extinguisher. Fire extinguishers should also be placed within easy reach, and placed in corridors or aisles that lead to an exit, never be blocked by equipment or stacked boxes, and be placed by potential fire hazards. Place the fire extinguisher so it will not potentially be cut off from a fire, or be damaged by equipment, such as a fork lift. Place it where they will be protected from the elements. A fire extinguisher cabinet could help facilitate this. The placement of signage indicating the fire extinguisher in red helps letting clients, customers, and employees know...

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How To Prepare For Common Restaurant Kitchen Fire Hazards

Posted by on Jun 9, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on How To Prepare For Common Restaurant Kitchen Fire Hazards

How To Prepare For Common Restaurant Kitchen Fire Hazards Whether you operate a quick-service chophouse or a five-star bistro, your restaurant kitchen is a hotbed of flammable materials and high-powered cooking methods. If you want to avoid disaster, it’s important to remember that your fire safety standards are just as unique and important as the food you serve and the number of customers you attract. Despite modern safety innovations and strict health and safety standards, disaster does strike thousands of kitchens every year. According to the U.S. Fire Administration, American fire departments respond to about 5,600 restaurant fires each year. These fires cost an estimated $116 million in property damage alone annually, in addition to 100 injuries and even a few deaths. Is your kitchen prepared to minimize the risks associated with your cooking methods, materials, and equipment? Fire hazards are common in most restaurant kitchens, but you can decrease your odds of disaster if you understand the specific safety precautions that each hazard requires. Faulty Electrical Wiring If you work in the restaurant industry, you’re already familiar with the importance of keeping your kitchen up-to-code. Local safety requirements and industry-wide safety standards don’t exist simply to prevent your customers from getting sick; they also apply to your power sources. Old, faulty, and exposed electrical wiring is a disaster waiting to happen, as are old kitchen appliances and breaker boxes. To avoid an electrical fire, pay close attention to the maintenance requirements outlined by the Occupational Health and Safety Act. Your specific equipment, kitchen size, and other details will affect the maintenance standards you must follow. And even if you have a well-maintained electrical system, you must also make sure flammable materials don’t come into contact with wall outlets. Clogged Hood Filters Restaurant exhaust hoods are designed to eliminate excess grease, gases, smoke, and odors from your kitchen. They play a crucial role in keeping your restaurant safe and up-to-code, but they depend on a working and well-maintained filtration system to do the job properly. When grease accumulates on hood filters, it makes them less efficient, but it also creates a new fire hazard right above your cooking surfaces. Know how to clean your exhaust hood properly, and make sure you and your staff prioritize this process. Follow both manufacturer recommendations and OHSA safety regulations. In case of quick buildup or human error, make sure you also have a Class K Kitchen Fire Extinguisher exactly 20 feet from all stovetops. Oily Rags and Towels Your kitchen staff may use rags to wipe grease, oil, and other flammable substances off your kitchen surfaces throughout the day. It’s important to prevent these liquids from building up and creating fire hazards, but the rags themselves become fire hazards too. Don’t let highly combustible materials accumulate in your kitchen. According to the National Fire Protection agency, grease accumulation actually causes 21 percent of all restaurant fires. Spontaneous combustion is a very real risk when large amounts of grease are concentrated in one place, so make sure no one leaves oily rags or towels lying around. After a rag is used to wipe down grease, it should be contained in a non-flammable trash or laundry bin, preferably outside the kitchen area. Burning Solid Fuels Any fuels that produce excess heat or smoke will also require extra safety precautions. If you cook with solid fuel such as charcoal, briquettes, hardwood, or mesquite, you must have a working and well-maintained filtration system that prevents smoke and carbon monoxide buildup. You must also make sure it properly eliminates the flammable debris left behind. If flying debris from...

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What is the Fire Triangle?

Posted by on May 29, 2016 in Blog, Featured | Comments Off on What is the Fire Triangle?

What is the Fire Triangle?

What is the Fire Triangle? The fire triangle is used to show the three elements that when present together can cause a fire to start. These three ingredients are fuel, heat and oxygen, under all circumstances they should be kept apart to avoid a fire starting. Understanding the basic principles of the fire triangle is essential in helping to protect your business and prevent fires from breaking out. How does the fire triangle work? When fuel or flammable materials are heated, the energy stored inside starts to react with oxygen in the air, giving off heat. This creates a vicious cycle, which causes the fire to spread. To stop the spread of a fire you have to remove one of these elements to break the triangle. Tips for fighting and preventing fires based on the fire triangle: Oxygen This makes up about 20% of the air we breathe, so there is a ready supply to fuel a potential fire if flammable materials come into contact with enough heat to start a fire. Once a fire has started, depriving it of oxygen will weaken extinguish it. This is a principle used by some fire extinguishers. Foam and dry powder extinguishers can be used to smother flames and deprive the fire of oxygen, whereas the CO2 in carbon dioxide fire extinguishers will replace the oxygen to deprive the fuel source of it. Without a sufficient supply of Oxygen a fire will stop burning, so it’s always handy to keep appropriate fire extinguishers near areas with a high risk of fire. Always use fire extinguishers with care and check that you are using the correct type of fire extinguisher for the type of fire you are dealing with. Heat All flammable materials have a flash point, this is the lowest temperature at which they will ignite. If you are storing flammables on site then you will need to be aware of their flashpoints and make sure that all materials stored away from sources of heat and under their flash point temperature. If a fire does break out then having a water fire extinguisher on standby is a good idea. Water has the effect of cooling the fire, thus removing heat from the equation. However remember not to use water on electrical appliances or cooking oil fires. Fuel A fire will continue as long as there is fuel to burn. Fuel comes under three categories, solid, liquid and gas. Each type should be treated specially to ensure that their presence does not result in a fire. The most common types of fuel are solid materials. Just look around you, everyday materials that surround you such as paper, card, clothing, fabrics and furniture could all be potential fuel for a fire. To reduce the chance of a fire starting, keep these materials away from electric heaters, radiators and direct sunlight. Liquid fuel and flammable gases require more special attention. Ideally you should keep liquids and gases in a sealed container away from other flammables and possible sources of ignition or heat. You should regularly check for signs of damage to the containers and keep as small an amount as necessary on site. Of course following these tips can only help reduce the chance of a fire breaking out, so it is strongly advised to only keep flammable liquids and gases are absolutely needed and if no non-flammable alternative is available. Once a fire has started it is very difficult to remove the fuel, but wet chemical fire extinguishers which are specially designed for cooking oil and grease fires can achieve this. The chemicals released...

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Fire Extinguishers: Refill or Replace?

Posted by on May 15, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on Fire Extinguishers: Refill or Replace?

Fire Extinguishers: Refill or Replace?

Fire Extinguishers: Refill or Replace? If you’ve recently used your fire extinguishers to put out a fire, you have two choices: to refill (recharge) or replace your equipment. So which option is the right one? At ABCO Fire & Safety Inc, we can provide expert guidance to help keep your building safe and prepared for any circumstances in Pinellas Tampa St.Petersburg. or Clearwater FL. Schedule a fire extinguisher consultation today (727)692-3970 or (813)900-3814 Should You Refill or Replace Your Fire Extinguisher? The fire extinguishers you get from ABCO Fire & Safety Inc. are made to last a long time—up to 12 years or more—especially when you have us come out and inspect them once a year. What this means is that as long as the fire extinguisher shell stays in good shape (i.e. not cracked or dented), you will be able to recharge your fire extinguisher as many times as you need to. That said, fire extinguisher replacement isn’t a bad idea either—especially for smaller fire extinguishers. If you’re not sure whether you should have fire extinguisher repair or fire extinguisher replacement, just call ABCO Fire & Safety Inc.! We can inspect the used fire extinguishers and recommend fire extinguisher repair or fire extinguisher replacement. Remember that you should call us any time you use any amount of extinguishant—even just a tiny bit. Releasing just a little bit of extinguishant could result in your fire extinguisher being unable to protect you the next time around. Note: the above only applies to fire extinguishers that have been used. If you haven’t touched your fire extinguisher in a while and it’s slowly losing its charge, call ABCO Fire & Safety Inc to inspect it—you may have a leak or a small crack in the shell which would automatically require full on fire extinguisher replacement. When Does an Extinguisher Need to Be Replaced? Obviously you want to have your fire extinguisher recharged or replaced every time you use it. But when else should you replace your fire extinguishers? A fire extinguisher should be replaced any time its charge has been compromised. This means fire extinguisher replacement if: The hose or nozzle is cracked, ripped or clogged The pin on the handle is broken or missing The handle is wobbly The inspection tag is missing The shell is cracked or damaged If you have fire extinguishers in your building that have been used recently and have lost some of their charge, call ABCO Fire & Safety Inc! We can come check out your fire extinguisher and help you decide whether you need fire extinguisher recharge or fire extinguisher replacement. And if your fire extinguisher is damaged or malfunctioning in any way, we can replace it straight away! Contact us online or by phone at (727)692-3970 or (813)900-3814 to schedule your fire extinguisher...

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